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Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.


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Volume 31, Issue 1

Issues

Children’s environmental health indicators in Australia: are we collecting the right information?

Peter D. Sly
  • Corresponding author
  • L7 Centre for Children’s Health Research, 62 Graham St South Brisbane Qld 4101, Australia
  • World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Children’s Health and Environment, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute and Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ J. Leith Sly
  • World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Children’s Health and Environment, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute and Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Sophie E. Moore
  • World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Children’s Health and Environment, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute and Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Paul Jagals
Published Online: 2016-03-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0064

Abstract

In order to assess progress in improving children’s health objectively standardized measurements are required. The World Health Organization (WHO) undertook a pilot project to develop and implement a series of children’s environmental health indicators (CEHI) to facilitate this process. No countries in Oceania were included in this pilot. This project was undertaken to determine whether data collected and publicly available in Australia were sufficient to address the CEHI. Government documents and websites were searched to obtain publicly available data. These data adequately reflected outcome indicators but data addressing many exposure indicators were either missing or not available in a child-specific format. Australia does collect data on child health and well-being but not in a form compatible with the WHO CEHI.

Keywords: Australia; burden of disease; children’s environmental health; health indicators

References

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    Sly JL, Moore SE, Gore F, Brune MN, Neira M, et al. Children’s Environmental Health Indicators in Australia. Ann Glob Health 2016 (In Press).Google Scholar

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About the article

Corresponding author: Professor Peter D. Sly, L7 Centre for Children’s Health Research, 62 Graham St South Brisbane Qld 4101, Australia, Phone: +61 7 3069 7383, E-mail: ; and World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Children’s Health and Environment, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute and Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia


Received: 2015-10-27

Accepted: 2015-11-21

Published Online: 2016-03-16

Published in Print: 2016-03-01


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, Volume 31, Issue 1, Pages 163–167, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0064.

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