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Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.616

CiteScore 2018: 1.69

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.508
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.664

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2191-0308
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Volume 31, Issue 1

Issues

Sustainable development through a gendered lens: climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction

Nancy D. Lewis
Published Online: 2016-03-04 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0077

Abstract

The UN General Assembly has just adopted the post 2015 Sustainable Development Agenda articulated in the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Achieving the SDGs will be furthered by the closer integration of the climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk reduction (DRR) agendas. Gender provides us a valuable portal for considering this integration. Acknowledging that gender relaters to both women and men and that men and women experience climate variability and disasters differently, in this paper the role of women in both CCA and DRR is explored, shifting the focus from women as vulnerable victims to women as critical agents for change with respect to climate change mitigation and adaptation and reduction of disaster risks. Appropriately targeted interventions can also empower women and contribute to more just and inclusive sustainable development.

Keywords: agents of change; gender; sustainable development goals; vulnerability; women

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About the article

Corresponding author: Nancy D. Lewis, Director, Research Program, East-West Center, 1601 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96848-1601, USA, Phone: +(808) 944-7245, Fax: +(808) 944-7399, E-mail:


Received: 2015-12-16

Accepted: 2015-12-22

Published Online: 2016-03-04

Published in Print: 2016-03-01


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, Volume 31, Issue 1, Pages 97–102, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0077.

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