Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board Member: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.

4 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 1.95

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.543
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.885

Online
ISSN
2191-0308
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Ahead of print

Issues

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program: a model for multidisciplinary training of the next generation of environmental health scientists

Danielle J. Carlin
  • Corresponding author
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, 111 TW Alexander Dr, Durham, NC 27709, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Heather Henry
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Michelle Heacock
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Brittany Trottier
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Christina H. Drew
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ William A. Suk
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-10-23 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2017-0024

Abstract

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) funds university-based, multidisciplinary research on human health and environmental science and engineering with the central goals to understand how hazardous substances contribute to disease and how to prevent exposures to these environmental chemicals. This multi-disciplinary approach allows early career scientists (e.g. graduate students and postdoctoral researchers) to gain experience in problem-based, solution-oriented research and to conduct research in a highly collaborative environment. Training the next generation of environmental health scientists has been an important part of the SRP since its inception. In addition to basic research, the SRP has grown to include support of broader training experiences such as those in research translation and community engagement activities that provide opportunities to give new scientists many of the skills they will need to be successful in their field of research. Looking to the future, the SRP will continue to evolve its training component by tracking and analyzing outcomes from its trainees by using tools such as the NIEHS CareerTrac database system, by increasing opportunities for trainees interested in research that goes beyond US boundaries, and in the areas of bioinformatics and data integration. These opportunities will give them the skills needed to be competitive and successful no matter which employment sector they choose to enter after they have completed their training experience.

Keywords: academia; alternative careers in science; education; professional development; training

References

  • 1.

    Landrigan PJ, Wright RO, Cordero JF, Eaton DL, Goldstein BD, et al. The NIEHS Superfund Research Program: 25 years of translational research for public health. Environ Health Perspect 2015;123(10):909–18.Web of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 2.

    Blair IA. A dynamic career in MS: applications to biomedical research. Future Sci OA 2015;1(4):Fso52.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 3.

    Ozonoff D. Superfund basic research program: a model for contemporary research programs. Environ Health Perspect 2003;111(3):A140–1.PubMedCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 4.

    Wilson SH. Reflections on the Superfund Research Program: a tribute to its founding director, William A. Suk. DNA Repair (Amst) 2014;22:v–viii.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 5.

    Anderson BE, Naujokas MF, Suk WA. Interweaving knowledge resources to address complex environmental health challenges. Environ Health Perspect 2015;123(11):1095–9.Web of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 6.

    Committee on Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research NAoS, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine. Facilitating interdisciplinary research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2004.Google Scholar

  • 7.

    Viverette MA, Leaning J, Steeg SK, Gebbie KM, Litchveld M. Who will keep the public healthy? Assuring a legally prepared workforce. J Law Med Ethics 2003;31(4 Suppl):81–3.CrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 8.

    Institute of Medicine Committee on Assessing Interactions Among Social Behavioral Genetic Factors in Health. In: Hernandez LM, Blazer DG, editors. Genes, behavior, and the social environment: moving beyond the nature/nurture debate. Washington, DC: National Academies Press (US) National Academy of Sciences, 2006:232–5.Google Scholar

  • 9.

    James AS, Gehlert S, Bowen DJ, Colditz GA. A framework for training transdisciplinary scholars in cancer prevention and control. J Cancer Educ 2015;30(4):664–9.CrossrefWeb of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 10.

    Sauermann H, Roach M. Scientific workforce. Why pursue the postdoc path? Science 2016;352(6286):663–4.Google Scholar

  • 11.

    Zolas N, Goldschlag N, Jarmin R, Stephan P, Smith JO, et al. Wrapping it up in a person: Examining employment and earnings outcomes for Ph.D. recipients. Science 2015;350(6266):1367–71.CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • 12.

    Alberts B, Kirschner MW, Tilghman S, Varmus H. Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2014;111(16):5773–7.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 13.

    Adams LG. Putting together a scientific team: collaborative science. Trends Microbiol 2014;22(9):483–5.PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • 14.

    Mishamandani S. Seven promising superfund trainees receive K.C. Donnelly award. Environmental Factor [Internet] 2015. Accessed 2016 August 22.Google Scholar

  • 15.

    McGee R, Jr., Saran S, Krulwich TA. Diversity in the biomedical research workforce: developing talent. Mt Sinai J Med 2012;79(3):397–411.PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • 16.

    Suk WA. The CEECHE: a practical approach for reducing exposures and disease outcomes in Central and Eastern Europe. Rev Environ Health 2017;32(1–2):3–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 17.

    Craft ES, Donnelly KC, Neamtiu I, McCarty KM, Bruce E, et al. Prioritizing environmental issues around the world: opinions from an international Central and Eastern European environmental health conference. Environ Health Perspect 2006;114(12):1813–7.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 18.

    Goodson WH, 3rd, Lowe L, Carpenter DO, Gilbertson M, Manaf Ali A, et al. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead. Carcinogenesis 2015;36(Suppl 1):S254–96.CrossrefWeb of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 19.

    Narbonne JF, Robertson LW. 7th International PCB Workshop: chemical mixtures in a complex world. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2014;21(10):6269–75.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 20.

    Weidemann E, Andersson PL, Bidleman T, Boman C, Carlin DJ, et al. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2016;23(8):8141–59.CrossrefWeb of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 21.

    Suk WA. A quarter century of the Pacific Basin Consortium: looking back to move forward. Rev Environ Health 2016;31(1):3–9.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 22.

    Ramirez-Andreotta MD, Brusseau ML, Beamer P, Maier RM. Home gardening near a mining site in an arsenic-endemic region of Arizona: assessing arsenic exposure dose and risk via ingestion of home garden vegetables, soils, and water. Sci Total Environ 2013;454–455:373–82.Web of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • 23.

    Keller TE, Collier PJ, Blakeslee JE, Logan K, McCracken K, et al. Early career mentoring for translational researchers: mentee perspectives on challenges and issues. Teach Learn Med 2014;26(3):211–6.Web of SciencePubMedCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 24.

    Garcia P, Armstrong R, Zaman MH. Models of education in medicine, public health, and engineering. Science 2014;345(6202):1281–3.Web of ScienceCrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 25.

    Pattin KA, Greene AC, Altman RB, Cohen KB, Wethington E, et al. Training the next generation of quantitative biologists in the era of big data. Pac Symp Biocomput 2015;22:488–92.Google Scholar

  • 26.

    Wild CP. The exposome: from concept to utility. Int J Epidemiol 2012;41(1):24–32.PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

About the article

Received: 2017-08-02

Accepted: 2017-08-30

Published Online: 2017-10-23


Author Statement

Research funding: Authors state no funding involved. Conflict of interest: Authors state no conflict of interest. Informed consent: Informed consent is not applicable. Ethical approval: The conducted research is not related to either human or animal use.


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2017-0024.

Export Citation

©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. Copyright Clearance Center

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in