Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Review of Network Economics

Editor-in-Chief: Grzybowski, Lukasz

Ed. by Briglauer, Wolfgang / Goetz, Georg / Pereira, Pedro

4 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 0.357
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 0.894

CiteScore 2017: 0.64

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.315
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.770

Online
ISSN
1446-9022
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 10, Issue 1

Issues

Twitter Adoption in Congress

Feng Chi / Nathan Yang
Published Online: 2011-03-02 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2202/1446-9022.1255

We study the early adoption of Twitter in the 111th House of Representatives. Our main objective is to determine whether successes of past adopters have the tendency to speed up Twitter adoption, where past success is defined as the average followers per Tweet — a common measure of “Twitter success” — among all prior adopters. The data suggests that accelerated adoption can be associated with favorable past outcomes: increasing the average number of followers per Tweet among past adopters by a standard deviation (of eight followers per Tweet) accelerates the adoption time by about 112 days. This acceleration effect is weaker for those who already have adopted Facebook and those who have access to information about a large number of past adopters. We later find a positive relationship between an adopter's own success and the success of adopters preceding him/her. Thus, there may exist benefits associated with adopting Twitter based on past successes of others. In general, the patterns we find are consistent with predictions generated by a simple model of adoption delay with learning.

Keywords: diffusion of technology; network effects; political marketing; social learning; social media

About the article

Published Online: 2011-03-02


Citation Information: Review of Network Economics, Volume 10, Issue 1, ISSN (Online) 1446-9022, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2202/1446-9022.1255.

Export Citation

©2011 Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin/Boston.Get Permission

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Gabriel Michael and Colin Agur
Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 2018, Volume 15, Number 3, Page 262
[2]
Jeff Hemsley, Martha Garcia-Murillo, and Ian P. MacInnes
Policy & Internet, 2018
[3]
Osnat Akirav
International Journal of E-Politics, 2017, Volume 8, Number 4, Page 1
[4]
Rosa Borge Bravo and Marc Esteve Del Valle
Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 2017, Page 1
[5]
[7]
Rune Karlsen and Bernard Enjolras
The International Journal of Press/Politics, 2016, Volume 21, Number 3, Page 338
[8]
Matthew A. Shapiro and Libby Hemphill
Policy & Internet, 2017, Volume 9, Number 1, Page 109
[9]
Sounman Hong and Sun Hyoung Kim
Government Information Quarterly, 2016, Volume 33, Number 4, Page 777
[10]
John A. Scherpereel, Jerry Wohlgemuth, and Margaret Schmelzinger
European Politics and Society, 2017, Volume 18, Number 2, Page 111
[11]
Andreas Jungherr
Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 2016, Volume 13, Number 1, Page 72
[12]
Sounman Hong and Daniel Nadler
Policy & Internet, 2016, Volume 8, Number 1, Page 91
[14]
Sounman Hong
Government Information Quarterly, 2013, Volume 30, Number 4, Page 464

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in