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Science and Engineering of Composite Materials

Editor-in-Chief: Hoa, Suong V.

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Volume 23, Issue 2

Issues

Assessment of sand stabilization potential of a plant-derived biomass

Dunja Perić
  • Kansas State University, College of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Manhattan, KS 66506-5000, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Paul A. Bartley / Lawrence Davis
  • Kansas State University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Manhattan, KS 66506-5000, USA
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/ Ali Ulvi Uzer / Cahit Gürer
  • Corresponding author
  • Afyon Kocatepe University Engineering Faculty, Department of Civil Engineering, ANS Campus, Afyonkarahisar 03200, Turkey
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Published Online: 2014-09-20 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/secm-2014-0061

Abstract

Lignin is a coproduct of biofuel and paper industries, which exhibits binding qualities when mixed with water. Lignin is an ideal candidate for a sustainable stabilization of unpaved roads. To this end, an experimental program was devised and carried out to quantify effects of lignin on compaction and early age shear strength behaviors of sand. Samples were prepared by mixing a particular type of coproduct called calcium lignosulfonate (CaL) with sand and water. Based on the extensive analyses of six series of strength tests, it was found that a normalized cohesion increased with an increasing normalized areas ratio. Normalizations were carried out by dividing the cohesion and area ratio by gravimetric CaL content whereby the area ratio was obtained by dividing the portion of the cross-sectional area occupied with lignosulfonate-water (CaL-W) paste by the total cross-sectional area. While the increase in the normalized cohesion eventually leveled out, the cohesion peaked at 6% of CaL. Thus, sand-CaL-water (S-CaL-W) mixes sustained larger shear stresses than dry sand for a range of normal stresses below the limiting normal stress. Consequently, the early age behavior indicates that adding CaL-W to sand is clearly beneficial in the near-surface applications in dry sand.

Keywords: biomaterial; coproduct; sand; shear strength; stability; unpaved roads

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About the article

Corresponding author: Cahit Gürer, Afyon Kocatepe University Engineering Faculty, Department of Civil Engineering, ANS Campus, Afyonkarahisar 03200, Turkey, Phone:+90 272 2281423 (62164), e-mail:


Received: 2014-02-25

Accepted: 2014-05-28

Published Online: 2014-09-20

Published in Print: 2016-03-01


Citation Information: Science and Engineering of Composite Materials, Volume 23, Issue 2, Pages 227–236, ISSN (Online) 2191-0359, ISSN (Print) 0792-1233, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/secm-2014-0061.

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