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Semiotica

Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique

Editor-in-Chief: Danesi, Marcel

6 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 0.32

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.240
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.819

Online
ISSN
1613-3692
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Volume 2013, Issue 197 (Oct 2013)

Issues

Between the grid and composition: Layout in PowerPoint's design and use

Emilia Djonov / Theo Van Leeuwen
Published Online: 2013-10-23 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/sem-2013-0078

Abstract

Ubiquitous software such as PowerPoint has contributed to making layout an important semiotic resource in everyday professional communication. Drawing on developments in the visual arts, graphic design, and social semiotics, this paper presents two central and complementary principles for layout design and analysis: the grid and composition. These principles are then applied in a conceptualization of the template as an interface between the grid and composition, which provides a basis for comparing default layout templates in PowerPoint for Windows 2003 and 2007. The comparison reveals that options in PowerPoint 2007 are less explicit from the perspectives of both grid-based design and composition, and considerably limit users' freedom in layout design. We then consider the implications of the limited guidance that PowerPoint, through its default layout options and help menu, offers its users on how to use layout effectively with reference to a survey of twenty-seven slideshow presentations from corporate and higher education settings and three case studies selected from this data. The survey and case studies suggest that PowerPoint users can benefit from explicit advice about both grid-based design and composition as well as a stronger awareness of the limitations and advantages of using templates.

Keywords: layout; grid; composition; template; PowerPoint; new writing

About the article

Emilia Djonov

Emilia Djonov (b. 1975) is a lecturer at Macquarie University and an honorary research fellow at the University of Technology 〈 〉. Her research interests include multimodal and hypermedia discourse analysis, visual communication, social semiotics, and systemic functional theory. Her publications include “Children's website structure and navigation” (2008); and Critical Multimodal Studies of Popular Discourse (co-edited with S. Zhao, 2014).

Theo Van Leeuwen

Theo Van Leeuwen (b. 1947) is a professor of language and communication at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense, and emeritus professor at the University of Technology 〈 〉. His research interests include social semiotics, critical discourse analysis, multimodality, and visual communication. His publications include Discourse and practice: New tools for critical discourse analysis (2008); The language of new media design (with R. Martinec, 2009); and The language of color (2011).


Published Online: 2013-10-23

Published in Print: 2013-10-25


Citation Information: Semiotica, ISSN (Online) 1613-3692, ISSN (Print) 0037-1998, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/sem-2013-0078.

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©[2013] by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston. Copyright Clearance Center

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