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Scandinavian Journal of Pain

Official Journal of the Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain

Editor-in-Chief: Breivik, Harald

4 Issues per year


CiteScore 2017: 0.84

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.401
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.452

Online
ISSN
1877-8879
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Volume 8, Issue 1

Hyperalgesia after experimental and work-related sleep restriction

K.B. Nilsen
  • National Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Work Psychology and Physiology, Oslo, Norway
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Neuroscience, Trondheim, Norway
  • Oslo University Hospital – Ullevål, Department of Neurology, Section for Clinical Neurophysiology, Oslo Norway
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ D. Matrea
  • Corresponding author
  • National Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Work Psychology and Physiology, Oslo, Norway
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2015-07-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.018

Abstract

Aims

Sleep restriction (SR) increases pain sensitivity. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of night work on pain sensitivity with experimental SR.

Methods

In study I 22 healthy volunteers (14 females) and in study II 24 nurses (17 females) received pain stimuli in the laboratory twice; after 2 nights with habitual sleep (study I and II) and after 2 nights of experimental 50% SR (study I) or after 2 nights of work (study II). Order of sleep conditions was randomized. Heat pain at intensity 6/10 (pain-6), the pressure pain threshold (PPT), and subjective sleepiness with Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) were assessed. A linear mixed model (LMM) with random intercept and random slope was used. Difference scores were compared between study I and II by independent t-tests (PPT and pain-6) and the Mann–Whitney U test (KSS).

Results

Baseline subjective sleepiness (KSS), PPT or pain-6 ratings did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.47). KSS and heat pain ratings increased after both sleep conditions (p < 0.001), but did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.15). PPT was lower after experimental SR (p = 0.007), but unchanged after night work (p = 0.63), but did not differ between study I and II (p = 0.16).

Conclusions

Both experimental and night work-induced SR leads to comparable increased subjective sleepiness and higher pain ratings to heat pain stimuli. PPT was lower after experimental SR, but was not affected by night work-induced SR.

About the article

Published Online: 2015-07-01

Published in Print: 2015-07-01


Citation Information: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Volume 8, Issue 1, Pages 52–53, ISSN (Online) 1877-8879, ISSN (Print) 1877-8860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.018.

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© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain.Get Permission

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