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Scandinavian Journal of Pain

Official Journal of the Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain

Editor-in-Chief: Werner, Mads


CiteScore 2018: 0.85

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.494
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.427

Online
ISSN
1877-8879
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Volume 16, Issue 1

Issues

Neuromas in patients with peripheral nerve injury and amputation - An ongoing study

N.S. Buch
  • Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ E. Qerama / N.B. Finnerup / L. Nikolajsen
  • Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-07-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.014

Abstract

Background and aims

Injury to peripheral nerves associated with trauma, amputation, or surgery may lead to the formation of neuromas that can cause severe pain. Unfortunately, neuromas are frequently refractory to medical and surgical treatment. This ongoing study examines whether neuromas are more frequent in patients experiencing pain after peripheral nerve injury or amputation than in patients without pain.

Methods

In this observational cohort study, 80 patients with peripheral nerve injury or amputation will be recruited. Patients will answer pain questionnaires and undergo a clinical examination with quantitative sensory testing performed within the area of spontaneous pain, including areas of brush-evoked allodynia and pinprick hyperalgesia. Neuromas are identified using ultrasound.

Results

Patient inclusion is ongoing. At present, fourteen amputees have participated in the study: nine males and four females, aged 38–77 years. Six patients had no neuromas. Stump pain in this group ranged from 0 to 8 and phantom pain from 0 to 10 on a numerical rating scale, 0–10. Eight patients had neuromas. Stump pain in this group ranged from 0 to 7 and phantom pain from 0 to 8. Further results will be presented at the congress.

Conclusions

Because of a limited number of patients included, it is not yet possible to conclude if neuromas are more frequent in patients with pain.

Hopefully, this study will increase our understanding of the role of neuromas in patients with pain after peripheral nerve injury and amputation.

About the article

Published Online: 2017-07-01

Published in Print: 2017-07-01


Citation Information: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Volume 16, Issue 1, Pages 168–168, ISSN (Online) 1877-8879, ISSN (Print) 1877-8860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.014.

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