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Scandinavian Journal of Pain

Official Journal of the Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain

Editor-in-Chief: Werner, Mads


CiteScore 2018: 0.85

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.494
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.427

Online
ISSN
1877-8879
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Volume 16, Issue 1

Issues

Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitates cortical somatosensory excitability

E. De Martino
  • Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, The Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
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  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ L. Petrini
  • Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, The Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ S. Schabrun
  • Brain Rehabilitation and Neuroplasticity Unit (BRAiN-u), Western Sydney University, School of Science and Heath, Sydney, Australia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ T. Graven-Nielsen
  • Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, The Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-07-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.016

Abstract

Background and aims

Maladaptive plasticity in neural circuits has been proposed in chronic musculoskeletal pain and has been discussed as a key component of the transition from acute to chronic pain. The induction of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in healthy individuals is one method that can be used to investigate the adaptations of neural circuits in response to several days of muscle hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to determine the adaptations of the sensory cortex in response to muscle hyperalgesia induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor muscles. It was hypothesized that muscle hyperalgesia would result in a facilitation of cortical somatosensory excitability, based on sensory evoked potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the radial nerve.

Methods

Twelve healthy subjects performed eccentric exercise of the wrist extensors. Muscle soreness, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) based on 10 channel EEG recorded during electrical stimulation of the radial nerve were recorded before (Day0Pre), 2h (Day0Post), 2 days (Day2), and 6 days (Day6) after exercise.

Results

Compared to Day0Pre: (i) Muscle soreness increased at Day0Post and increased further at Day2 (both P < 0.05). (ii) Pressure pain thresholds decreased at Day2 (P < 0.05), (iii) the peak-to-peak N30-P45 and P45-N60 amplitude of the sensory evoked potential from the central-parietal recording sites were increased at Day2 (both P < 0.05); (iv) reduction in ECR PPTs was correlated with an increase of the post-central P45 wave.

Conclusions

These data demonstrate that hyperalgesia developing across several days is accompanied by an increase in sensory cortical excitability. In addition, sensory cortical adaptation followed a similar temporal profile to increased sensitivity to pressure (PPTs). This model may be relevant for further understanding neural adaptation in the transition from acute to chronic pain.

About the article

Published Online: 2017-07-01

Published in Print: 2017-07-01


Citation Information: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Volume 16, Issue 1, Pages 169–169, ISSN (Online) 1877-8879, ISSN (Print) 1877-8860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.016.

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