Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Scandinavian Journal of Pain

Official Journal of the Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain

Editor-in-Chief: Breivik, Harald


CiteScore 2018: 0.85

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.494
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.427

Online
ISSN
1877-8879
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 16, Issue 1

Issues

Topical allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil) as a TRPA1-dependent human surrogate model of pain, hyperalgesia, and neurogenic inflammation – A dose response study

H.H. Andersen
  • Laboratory of Experimental Cutaneous Pain Research, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, School of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ S. Lo Vecchio
  • Laboratory of Experimental Cutaneous Pain Research, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, School of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ P. Gazerani
  • Laboratory of Experimental Cutaneous Pain Research, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, School of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ L. Arendt-Nielsen
  • Laboratory of Experimental Cutaneous Pain Research, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, School of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-07-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.045

Abstract

Aims

Transient receptor potential ion channel A1 (TRPA1) has been shown to play a pathoetiological role in several painful and inflammatory conditions and therefore several new drug candidates, targeting TRPA1 are currently being developed [1]. While the natural TRPA1-agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, known as “mustard oil”) is an exceedingly common animal pain model, it has only been sparsely investigated as a potential human surrogate model of pain and neurogenic inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate dose-response features of AITC as a sensitizing, algogenic irritant in human skin.

Methods

Three concentrations of AITC (10%, 50%, 90%) and vehicle (100% paraffin) were applied for 5 min to 3 cm × 3 cm areas on the volar forearms in 14 healthy volunteers, and evoked pain (visual analog scale 0–100 mm) and pain quality were assessed. Following the application, a battery of quantitative sensory tests was conducted including assessment of mechanical and thermal sensitivity. Neurogenic inflammation was evaluated using Laser Perfusion Imaging (FLPI). Erythema and pigmentation were assessed before, immediately after and≈64 h after AITC exposure.

Results

Topical application of AITC induced significant dose-dependent, moderate-to-severe spontaneous pain mostly described as burning as well as mechanical and heat hyperalgesia (p < 0.05). The model also produced robust dynamic mechanical allodynia (p < 0.05). Only modest increases in pain hypersensitivity were observed between the 50% and 90% concentrations. Neurogenic inflammation was evoked by all concentrations and assessments by FLPI demonstrated a significant dose dependent increase from 10% to 50% ATIC, with a ceiling effect from 50% to 90%.

Conclusions

Topical AITC-application evokes dose-dependent rapid pain and somatosensory sensitization with optimal concentrations recommended to be above 10% and equal to or below 50%. The model is translatable and could be useful in pharmacological proof-of-concept studies of TRPA1-antagonists, analgesics and anti-inflammatory compounds or for exploratory clinical purposes (e.g. loss- or gain-of-function in peripheral neuropathies).

Reference

About the article

Published Online: 2017-07-01

Published in Print: 2017-07-01


Citation Information: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Volume 16, Issue 1, Pages 180–180, ISSN (Online) 1877-8879, ISSN (Print) 1877-8860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.045.

Export Citation

© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain.Get Permission

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in