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Scandinavian Journal of Pain

Official Journal of the Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain

Editor-in-Chief: Werner, Mads


CiteScore 2018: 0.85

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.494
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.427

Online
ISSN
1877-8879
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Volume 16, Issue 1

Issues

The effect of facilitated temporal summation of pain, widespread pressure hyperalgesia and pain intensity in patients with knee osteoarthritis on the responds to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs – A preliminary analysis

K.K. Petersen
  • SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Farsø, Denmark
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ O. Simonsen / M.M. Andersen / A.E. Olesen / L. Arendt-Nielsen
  • SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
  • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Farsø, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-07-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.050

Abstract

Background

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) treatment is recommended as the first step in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Due to the risk of side-effects of NSIADs and low responds rate, methods for selection of NSAID responders are highly warranted. Recent studies suggest that pain sensitization in KOA might be predictive for the effect of surgical treatment, why the purpose of the present study was to evaluated whether quantitative sensory testing (QST) could be predictive for the effect of NSAID treatment in KOA.

Material and methods

100 patients were enrolled and assessed using temporal summation of pain (TSP), pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS; 0: no pain and 10: worst imaginable pain) before and 8 weeks after daily treatment of Ibuprofen 400 mg × 3, Paracetamol 1 g × 3 and Pantoprazole 20 mg × 1. TSP was assessed by the difference in pain scores to one PinPrick stimulus followed by 10 PinPrick stimuli. PPT was assessed at the extensor carpi radialis longus muscle. Responders were categorized as decrease in pain intensity of at least three VAS-points.

Results

80 patients had complete data at follow-up. 28 patients were categorized as responders and 52 patients as non-responders. Pre-treatment pain intensity (responders: 7.5 (SD: 1.6) vs. nonresponders: 6.5 (SD: 2.3), P < 0.03) and TSP (responders: 1.9 (SD: 2.5) vs. non-responders: 1.0 (SD: 1.5), P < 0.05) were significantly higher in responders compared with non-responders. Pre-treatment PPT at the arm trended towards significantly lower in responders (293 kPa (SD: 85)) compared with no responders (339 kPa (SD: 124), P < 0.06).

Conclusions

This preliminary analysis indicate that KOA patients with high pain intensities, facilitated TSP and widespread pressure hyperalgesia respond to NSAIDs.

About the article

Published Online: 2017-07-01

Published in Print: 2017-07-01


Citation Information: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Volume 16, Issue 1, Pages 182–182, ISSN (Online) 1877-8879, ISSN (Print) 1877-8860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.050.

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