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Selected Scientific Papers - Journal of Civil Engineering

The Journal of Technical University of Kosice

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1338-7278
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Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

Július Strigáč
Published Online: 2015-12-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/sspjce-2015-0020

Abstract

The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I –SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

Keywords: alternative fuels; alternative raw materials; clinker quality

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About the article

Published Online: 2015-12-01

Published in Print: 2015-11-01


Citation Information: Selected Scientific Papers - Journal of Civil Engineering, Volume 10, Issue 2, Pages 81–92, ISSN (Online) 1338-7278, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/sspjce-2015-0020.

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© 2015 Július Strigáč, published by De Gruyter Open. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. BY-NC-ND 4.0

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