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STUF - Language Typology and Universals

Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung

Editor-in-Chief: Stolz, Thomas

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Cite Score 2016: 0.14

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2196-7148
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Volume 70, Issue 2 (Jul 2017)

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Motion in serializing languages revisited: The case of Avatime

Saskia van Putten
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  • Faculty of Arts, Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University, PO Box 9103, 6500 HDNijmegen, The Netherlands
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Published Online: 2017-07-14 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/stuf-2017-0016

Abstract

In the typology of motion lexicalization, two types of languages have traditionally been distinguished: satellite-framed and verb-framed. Serializing languages are difficult to fit into this typology and have been claimed to belong to a third type: equipollently framed. In this paper I use grammatical criteria to show that Avatime, a serializing language, should indeed be classified as equipollently framed. I also study motion descriptions in narratives. Avatime is similar to other serializing languages with respect to path elaboration, but unlike other serializing languages, it has low manner saliency. Equipollently framed languages thus do not behave as a single type.

Keywords: motion events; serial verb constructions; narrative style; Avatime; Kwa languages

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About the article

Published Online: 2017-07-14

Published in Print: 2017-07-26


Citation Information: STUF - Language Typology and Universals, ISSN (Online) 2196-7148, ISSN (Print) 1867-8319, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/stuf-2017-0016.

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