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Text & Talk

An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language, Discourse & Communication Studies

Ed. by Sarangi, Srikant


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 0.400
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 0.750

CiteScore 2018: 0.61

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.305
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.670

Online
ISSN
1860-7349
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Volume 26, Issue 4-5

Issues

Parents' inquiries about homework: The first mention

Leah Wingard
  • Corresponding author
  • Affiliate researcher in the Center for the Everyday Lives of Families; Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech and Communication Studies at San Francisco State University.
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Published Online: 2006-09-15 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/TEXT.2006.023

Abstract

Drawing from a corpus of naturally occurring parent–child interactions, this paper documents a common verbal practice used by US dual-earner parents to issue an early inquiry into children's homework. This practice is analyzed as a first discursive move to get homework accomplished. The analysis of this practice shows that parents' topicalizations of homework most often occur early in the afternoon and function to gauge the amount of homework that needs to be done and then allow the parent to initiate a sequence that plans for the doing of the homework into the rest of the day's activities. This practice starts a sequence of talk that illustrates the often difficult path that parents negotiate between retaining parent control and responsibility for the completion of homework, and socializing child autonomy. I also argue that this verbal practice is an indication of the degree to which parents orient to homework as an organizer of family activity on afternoons. Finally, this practice has implications for documenting the ways in which directives are not isolated utterances, but can in parent–child interaction be situated within a larger sequence of sequences in order to initiate activity.

Keywords: parent–child interaction; homework; family activities; directive sequences; first mentions

About the article

Leah Wingard

Leah Wingard is an a%liate researcher in the Center for the Everyday Lives of Families (URL: 〈http://www.ucla.celf.edu〉) and Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech and Communication Studies at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include parent–child interaction, talk-in-interaction, the role of emotions in discourse, and talk in broadcast media. Her work draws heavily on conversation analysis.


*Address for correspondence: Department of Speech Communication, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94312, USA


Published Online: 2006-09-15

Published in Print: 2006-09-01


Citation Information: Text & Talk - An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language, Discourse Communication Studies, Volume 26, Issue 4-5, Pages 573–596, ISSN (Online) 1860-7349, ISSN (Print) 1860-7330, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/TEXT.2006.023.

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Citing Articles

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[1]
Asta Cekaite
Text & Talk - An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language, Discourse & Communication Studies, 2010, Volume 30, Number 1, Page 1
[2]
Tamar Kremer-Sadlik and Amy L. Paugh
Time & Society, 2007, Volume 16, Number 2-3, Page 287
[3]
Charles Goodwin
Discourse & Society, 2007, Volume 18, Number 1, Page 53
[4]
Karin Aronsson and Asta Cekaite
Discourse & Society, 2011, Volume 22, Number 2, Page 137
[5]
Alexandra Craven and Jonathan Potter
Discourse Studies, 2010, Volume 12, Number 4, Page 419
[6]
Shi Li
Childhood Education, 2017, Volume 93, Number 1, Page 39
[8]
Leah Wingard and Lucas Forsberg
Journal of Pragmatics, 2009, Volume 41, Number 8, Page 1576
[9]
Hansun Zhang Waring and Barbara L. Hruska
Linguistics and Education, 2011, Volume 22, Number 4, Page 441
[11]
Elinor Ochs and Carolina Izquierdo
Ethos, 2009, Volume 37, Number 4, Page 391
[12]
Christopher J. Koenig, Leah M. Wingard, Christina Sabee, David Olsher, and Ilona Vandergriff
Journal of Applied Communication Research, 2014, Volume 42, Number 3, Page 244

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