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Text & Talk

An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language, Discourse & Communication Studies

Ed. by Sarangi, Srikant


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1860-7349
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Volume 34, Issue 4

Issues

Making arrangements in talk-in-interaction

Stuart Ekberg
  • Corresponding author
  • Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, 4059, Australia
  • School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, 5005, Australia
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  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Amanda LeCouteur
Published Online: 2014-06-27 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2014-0008

Abstract

Arrangement making is understood to be a “closing-relevant action” (Schegloff and Sacks 1973), but little attention has been given to how people arrive at mutually acceptable plans for the future. Telephone conversations between clients and staff of community and home care (CHC) services were studied to identify how arrangements for future services were made. A recurrent sequence was observed in which clients were informed of future arrangement and were prompted to reply with “response solicitation” (Jefferson 1981). Response solicitations were observed at two points: either tagged to the end of an informing, or following a recipient's response to the informing. We show how response solicitations are routinely used in instances where recipients have some discretion in relation to the arrangement under discussion. They are a means by which an informing party can display to their interlocutor that they, as recipient, have some discretion to exercise in the matter. These findings are discussed with reference to prior research on arrangement making in other settings, which suggests the general nature of this practice.

Keywords: arrangement making; conversation analysis; informings; proposals; response solicitation; institutional interaction

About the article

Stuart Ekberg

Stuart Ekberg is Research Fellow at the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at Queensland University of Technology and has previously held research posts at the Universities of Southampton and Bristol. He obtained his PhD from the University of Adelaide, for a study using the data presented here. His research to date has focused on social aspects of healthcare and education. Address for correspondence: Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, 4059, Australia 〈stuart.ekberg@qut.edu.au〉.

Amanda LeCouteur

Amanda LeCouteur is Co-Director of the Discourse and Psychology Unit at the University of Adelaide, where she teaches Research Methods and Philosophy of Science. She has published in the areas of racism, education, gender, and health. She has a long-standing interest in elite achievement and acts as a consultant in the Australian Football League. Her current research focuses on helplines, medical, and counseling interactions. Address for correspondence: School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, 5005, Australia 〈amanda.lecouteur@adelaide.edu.au〉.


Published Online: 2014-06-27

Published in Print: 2014-07-01


Citation Information: Text & Talk, Volume 34, Issue 4, Pages 377–400, ISSN (Online) 1860-7349, ISSN (Print) 1860-7330, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2014-0008.

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[1]
Terese Thonus
Linguistics and Education, 2016, Volume 33, Page 40

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