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The Linguistic Review

Editor-in-Chief: van der Hulst, Harry


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 0.463
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CiteScore 2018: 0.69

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.643
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1613-3676
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Volume 23, Issue 3

Issues

From fush to feesh: Exemplar priming in speech perception

Jennifer Hay / Aaron Nolan / Katie Drager
Published Online: 2006-11-07 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/TLR.2006.014

Abstract

Niedzielski (1999) reports on an experiment which demonstrates that individuals in Detroit ‘hear’ more Canadian Raising in the speech of a speaker when they think that speaker is Canadian. We describe an experiment designed to follow up on this result in a New Zealand context. Participants listened to a New Zealand English (NZE) speaker reading a list of sentences. Each sentence appeared on the answer-sheet, with a target word underlined. For each sentence, participants were asked to select from a synthesized vowel continuum the token that best matched the target vowel produced by the speaker. Half the participants had an answer-sheet with the word ‘Australian’ written on it, and half had an answer-sheet with ‘New Zealander’ written on it. Participants in the two conditions behaved significantly differently from one another. For example, they were more likely to hear a higher fronter /i/ vowel when ‘Australian’ appeared on the answer sheet, and more likely to hear a centralized version when ‘New Zealander’ appeared – a trend which reflects production differences between the two dialects. This is despite the fact that nearly all participants reported that they knew they were listening to a New Zealander. We discuss the implication of these results, and argue that they support exemplar models of speech perception.

About the article

Published Online: 2006-11-07

Published in Print: 2006-10-01


Citation Information: The Linguistic Review, Volume 23, Issue 3, Pages 351–379, ISSN (Online) 1613-3676, ISSN (Print) 0167-6318, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/TLR.2006.014.

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