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Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie

International journal of research in physical chemistry and chemical physics

Editor-in-Chief: Rademann, Klaus

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 1.144
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Online
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2196-7156
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Volume 228, Issue 10-12

Issues

The Interaction of Bio-Molecules with Lipid Membranes Studied by X-ray Diffraction

Maikel Rheinstädter
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilon ON, L8S 3Z5, Canada
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/ Laura Toppozini
  • Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilon ON, L8S 3Z5, Canada
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/ Hannah Dies
  • Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilon ON, L8S 3Z5, Canada
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Published Online: 2014-08-07 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/zpch-2014-0541

Abstract

For the past 100 years, X-ray diffraction has been a powerful and indispensable tool to study the structure of matter. The challenge when studying molecular ordering in biological materials is their inherent disorder and strong fluctuations, which often suppress the formation of Bragg peaks. In the case of membranes, X-rays can detect molecules inside and confined between membranes. In this article we review examples to highlight the capabilities and accomplishments of X-ray scattering for the determination of membrane structure. X-ray diffraction gives quantitative information about partitioning of a small molecule, ethanol, in lipid bilayers. By taking amyloid-β peptides as examples, it is demonstrated that the position of peptides in lipid membranes can be determined with high precision. Confinement between membranes can organize molecules, as is the case for a mono-nucleotide, adenosine monophosphate, and the resulting pattern might be important to understand the formation of short RNA strands. With new approaches and techniques, and the increasingly powerful and capable devices, X-ray diffraction will continue to be the work horse for the determination of molecular structure in biological materials.

Keywords: Lipid Membranes; X-ray Diffraction; Ethanol; Amyloid-β25–35 Peptide; Amyloid-β1−42 Peptide; Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP); Electron Density; Molecular Structure

About the article

Accepted: 2014-07-08

Received: 2014-05-30

Published Online: 2014-08-07

Published in Print: 2014-12-28


Citation Information: Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie, Volume 228, Issue 10-12, Pages 1105–1120, ISSN (Online) 2196-7156, ISSN (Print) 0942-9352, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/zpch-2014-0541.

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Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Sebastian Himbert, Richard J. Alsop, Markus Rose, Laura Hertz, Alexander Dhaliwal, Jose M. Moran-Mirabal, Chris P. Verschoor, Dawn M. E. Bowdish, Lars Kaestner, Christian Wagner, and Maikel C. Rheinstädter
Scientific Reports, 2017, Volume 7, Page 39661
[2]
Drew Marquardt, Richard Alsop, Maikel Rheinstädter, and Thad Harroun
Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease, 2015, Volume 2, Number 2, Page 125

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