The effect of endurance exercise-induced lactacidosis on biochemical markers of bone turnover

Markus Herrmann 1 , 1 , Miriam Müller 2 , 2 , Jürgen Scharhag 3 , 3 , Marga Sand-Hill 4 , 4 , Wilfried Kindermann 5 , 5  and Wolfgang Herrmann 6 , 6
  • 1 Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany
  • 2 Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany
  • 3 Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine, University of Saarland, Saarbrücken, Germany
  • 4 Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany
  • 5 Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine, University of Saarland, Saarbrücken, Germany
  • 6 Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany

Abstract

Background: Stress fractures are frequent injuries among athletes. In vitro, decreases in pH stimulate osteoclasts and inhibit osteoblasts. We hypothesized that exercise-induced lactacidosis stimulates osteoclasts and reduces osteoblast activity in vivo.

Methods: A total of 32 volunteers (MA, male athletes; MCo, male controls; female athletes; and female controls) performed three 60-min cycle ergometer tests at 75%, 95% and 110% of their individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). Blood was taken before and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Osteocalcin (OC), pro-collagen type I N-terminal peptide (PINP), C-terminal telopeptides of collagen I (CTx) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) were measured.

Results: At 75% and 95% IAT, pH did not change. At 110% IAT, pH decreased in MA by 0.08 units (p=0.041) and in MCo by 0.03 units (p=0.017). The pH results were substantiated by circulating lactate concentrations. The bone resorption markers TRAP and CTx were not consistently modified by any of the exercise tests. Exercise at 75% decreased OC and PINP in all groups. Exercise at 95% and 110% did not induce homogeneous effects.

Conclusions: Anaerobic exercise does not systemically affect bone turnover, suggesting that exercise-induced acidosis is not involved in the pathogenesis of stress fractures.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2007;45:1381–9.

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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine ( CCLM) publishes articles on novel teaching and training methods applicable to laboratory medicine. CCLM welcomes contributions on the progress in fundamental and applied research and cutting-edge clinical laboratory medicine. It is one of the leading journals in the field, with an impact factor of over three. CCLM is the official journal of nine national clinical societies and associated with EFLM.

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