Plasma creatinine medians from patients partitioned by gender and age used as a tool for assessment of analytical stability at different concentrations

Steen Ingemann Hansen 1 , Per Hyltoft Petersen 2 , 3 , Flemming Lund 2  and Callum G. Fraser 4
  • 1 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Dyrehavevej 29, 3400 Hillerød, Denmark
  • 2 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hillerød, Denmark
  • 3 Norwegian Quality Improvement of Laboratory Examinations (NOKLUS), Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway
  • 4 Centre for Research into Cancer Prevention and Screening, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland
Steen Ingemann Hansen
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Dyrehavevej 29, 3400 Hillerød, Denmark
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, Per Hyltoft Petersen
  • Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hillerød, Denmark
  • Norwegian Quality Improvement of Laboratory Examinations (NOKLUS), Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway
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, Flemming Lund
  • Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hillerød, Denmark
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and Callum G. Fraser
  • Centre for Research into Cancer Prevention and Screening, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland
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  • degruyter.comGoogle Scholar

Abstract

Background

Monthly medians of patient results are useful in assessment of analytical quality in medical laboratories. Separate medians by gender makes it possible to generate two independent estimates of contemporaneous errors. However, for plasma creatinine, reference intervals (RIs) are different by gender and also higher over 70 years of age.

Methods

Daily, weekly and monthly patient medians were calculated from the raw data of plasma creatinine concentrations for males between 18 and 70 years, males >70 years, females between 18 and 70 years and females >70 years.

Results

The medians of the four groups were all closely associated, with similar patterns. The mean of percentage bias from each group defined the best estimate of bias. The maximum half-range (%) of the bias evaluations provided an estimate of the uncertainty comparable to the analytical performance specifications: thus, bias estimates could be classified as optimum, desirable or minimum quality.

Conclusions

Medians by gender and age are useful in assessment of analytical stability for plasma creatinine concentration ranging from 60 to 90 μmol/L. The daily medians are valuable in rapid detection of large systematic errors, the weekly medians in detecting minor systematic errors and monthly medians in assessment of long-term analytical stability.

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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine ( CCLM) publishes articles on novel teaching and training methods applicable to laboratory medicine. CCLM welcomes contributions on the progress in fundamental and applied research and cutting-edge clinical laboratory medicine. It is one of the leading journals in the field, with an impact factor of over three. CCLM is the official journal of nine national clinical societies and associated with EFLM.

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