Manufacturing proximity through film remakes: Remake rights representatives and the case of local-language comedy remakes

Miguel Fernández Labayen
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Journalism and Audiovisual Communication, Charles III University of Madrid (UC3M), Getafe, Spain
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and Ana Martín Morán
  • Department of Communication Sciences and Sociology, King Juan Carlos University (URJC), Fuenlabrada, Spain
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Abstract

This article analyzes the industrial and cultural dynamics of transnational film remakes, focusing on the recent rise of remake rights representatives and the production of comedy remakes for local-language markets. Through the use of in-depth interviews with remake rights representatives and the analysis of primary and secondary sources, we scrutinize the strategies of these players in mediating the production processes of remaking foreign popular films into local-language hits. The article takes on two tasks: First, it dissects the work of the different agents at play in buying and selling remake rights and examines their business models and tactics; second, it looks at the generic contents that these agents are circulating through selected catalogs. In this context, comedy becomes a privileged interface to link diverse national markets and manufacture an ideal of proximity, whereby foreign popular comedies – unknown to local audiences – are remade with a local flavor and presented as ‘new’ national hits.

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The European Journal of Communication Research is an established forum for scholarship and academic debate in the field of communication science and research from a European perspective. Communications highlights the concerns of communication science through the publication of articles, research reports, review essays and book reviews on theoretical and methodological developments considered from a European perspective.

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