Hematology and erythrocyte osmotic fragility of the Franquet’s fruit bat (Epomops franqueti)

Oyetunde Kazeem Ekeolu 1  and Olamide Elizabeth Adebiyi 2
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Benin, Benin, Edo State, Nigeria
  • 2 Department of Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Oyetunde Kazeem Ekeolu and Olamide Elizabeth Adebiyi
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
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Abstract

Background

Hematological parameters are vital diagnostic tools for understanding health dynamics of humans and animals. Franquet’s fruit bat (Epomops franqueti) is host to several parasites such as protozoa, bacteria, viruses and mites. Yet, studies exploring the values of its blood components with interest for research or food purposes are scarce. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate the hematological values of the adult E. franqueti.

Methods

Seventeen (nine female and eight male) apparently healthy adult E. franqueti were captured from their roosting colony. Blood samples were collected for determination of erythrocyte indices [red blood cell count (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC)] and leukocyte indices [total white blood cell counts (WBC), lymphocytes, eosinophil, monocytes, neutrophil count and erythrocytes osmotic fragility].

Results

There were no significant (p≥0.05) sex-related differences in RBC, PCV, Hb concentration, MCV, MCH, MCHC and total and differential WBC of E. franqueti. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility was significantly higher in female than in male E. franqueti at 0.1% NaCl.

Conclusions

These considerations are critical in establishing reference ranges of blood parameters for E. franqueti and may provide insight to why they serve as reservoir hosts for several microorganisms.

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