Contagion, Liberalization, and the Optimal Structure of Globalization

Joseph E. Stiglitz
  • Columbia University

Advocates of capital market liberalization argue that it leads to greater stability: countries faced with a negative shock borrow from the rest of the world, allowing cross-country smoothing. There is considerable evidence against this conclusion. This paper explores one reason: integration can exacerbate contagion; a failure in one country can more easily spread to others. It derives conditions under which such adverse effects overwhelm the putative positive effects. It explains how capital controls can be welfare enhancing, reducing the risk of adverse effects from contagion. This paper presents an analytic framework within which we can begin to address broader questions of optimal economic architectures.

Purchase article
Get instant unlimited access to the article.
$42.00
Log in
Already have access? Please log in.


Journal + Issues

The Journal of Globalization and Development (JGD) publishes academic research and policy analysis on globalization, development and the complex interactions between them. It is dedicated to stimulating a dialogue between theoretical advances and rigorous empirical studies to push forward the frontiers of development analysis and seeks to combine academic insights with the in-depth knowledge of practitioners to address important policy issues.

Search