Umbilical cord thickness in the first and early second trimesters and perinatal outcome

Gokhan Goynumer 1 , Arzu Ozdemir 2 , Lale Wetherilt 3 , Birol Durukan 4 ,  and Murat Yayla 5
  • 1 Istanbul Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Turkey
  • 2 Istanbul Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Turkey
  • 3 Istanbul Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Turkey
  • 4 Istanbul Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Turkey
  • 5 Istanbul Goztepe Education and Research Hospital, Turkey

Abstract

Objectives: To study the association between thickness of the umbilical cord at 11+0 to 14+6 gestational weeks and perinatal outcome.

Methods: We studied 216 pregnant women between 11+0 and 14+6 weeks' gestation with singletons, intact membranes, normal volumes of amniotic fluid and a regular menstrual period. Patients with umbilical cord measurements below the 5th centile were defined as thin umbilical cord group and those between the 5th and 95th or above 95th centile were defined as non-lean umbilical cord group. Abortion or fetal demise, preeclampsia, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, birth weight, and 5-min Apgar scores were noted.

Results: A statistically significant difference existed between the mean gestational age, mode of delivery, birth weight and adverse perinatal outcome of the two groups. The relative risk of the adverse perinatal outcome in lean umbilical cords was 6.92 (2.71–17.67; 95% CI). The umbilical cord thickness correlated with birth weight (P<0.05).

Conclusions: Sonographic finding of a lean umbilical cord at 11+0 to 14+6 weeks' gestation should prompt the physician to strict monitoring of pregnancy.

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