Consensus in science

Peter Stallinga 1  and Igor Khmelinskii 2
  • 1 Departamento de Engenharia Electrónica e Informática, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
  • 2 Departamento de Química e Farmácia, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal

Abstract

The biggest argument in some areas of science is the existence of a consensus. However, on top of it being a non-scientific argument, it is easy to show how a consensus naturally evolves in modern research environments. In this paper we demonstrate analytically and by cellular automata how a consensus is obtained. Important conclusions are that a consensus is not necessarily representing the truth and, once established, can never change anymore.

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This quarterly published journal presents original articles on the theory and applications of Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo methods. Launched in 1995 the journal covers all stochastic numerics topics with emphasis on the theory of Monte Carlo methods and new applications in all branches of science and technology.

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