Implementing International Human Rights Law in Post Conflict Settings - Backlash without Buy-In: Lessons from Afghanistan

Leanne M Smith 1 , 1
  • 1 Princeton University, leannemariesmith@gmail.com

This paper explores the difficulties of implementing international human rights standards in post conflict states, particularly in Islamic States, using Afghanistan as a case study. The paper will submit that imposing international human rights law with a ‘top down' approach is ineffective, using the example of the western-style Afghan constitution which contains many human rights protections, such as freedom of religion, that cannot be realized in contemporary Afghan society. It will be argued that a more transparent, consultative and long-term approach to human rights implementation should be taken in post conflict situations, if ‘human rights' is to be more than a catch phrase for membership of the international community.

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Muslim World Journal of Human Rights offers a medium for scholarly debate on various aspects of the question of human rights as it relates to the Muslim World. MWJHR promises to serve as a forum in which barriers are bridged, and human rights are finally discussed with an eye on the Muslim world, in an open and creative manner.

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