Islands and Insularity: Between Law, Geography, and Fiction

Matteo Nicolini 1  and Thomas Perrin 2
  • 1 Department of Law, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
  • 2 UFR de Géographie et Aménagement, laboratory TVES, Université de Lille, Lille, France
Matteo Nicolini
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  • Department of Law, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
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  • Matteo Nicolini, PhD, Associate Professor of Public Comparative Law, the Department of Law, University of Verona (Italy); Visiting Lecturer at the Newcastle University Law School (the UK); external partner of the Centre for the Study of Law in Theory and Practice (LTAP), Liverpool John Moores University (the UK); Senior Researcher at the Institute of Comparative Federalism, Eurac Research (Italy). His fields of research include comparative methodology, European constitutional law, federal studies, judicial review of legislation, law and literature, African law, legal geography, and legal linguistics. He is the author of monographs, essays, and articles in Italian, Spanish, and English, including (with Thomas Bennett, Emilia Mickiewicz and Richard Mullender) the editing of Law and Imagination in Troubled Times: A Legal and Literary Discourse (Abingdon: Routledge, forthcoming 2020); “Turning Vanity Fair into The Coelestial City: England’s Legal Narratives of the Body Politic from Bunyan to Thackeray,” in Pólemos. Journal of Law, Literature and Culture, 12(1), 2018, 123–145; “Writing for the ‘Scholar and the gentleman’. Language, Society, and Legal Education in Blackstone’s Commentaries,” The Cardozo Electronic Law Bulletin, 34(2), 2018, 1–32; “Inequality of Goods and Lands’ in Mortgaged Democracies: Paradigms and Effects of Global Comparative Law,” Liverpool Law Review, 41(1), (2020): 27–44.
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and Thomas Perrin
  • Corresponding author
  • UFR de Géographie et Aménagement, laboratory TVES, Université de Lille, Lille, France
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  • Further information
  • Thomas Perrin, PhD, Lecturer in Regional Planning and Urbanism, University of Lille; research centre TVES; Mark Schuster Prize on Comparative Cultural Policy Research and Merit Prize in the Committee of the Regions’ Doctoral Thesis Competition (2011). His fields of research and teaching include regions, regional planning, and territorial cooperation on the one hand, and cultural policies and cultural relations, on the other. He is also expert for the “Compendium of Cultural Policies and Trends in Europe” and member of the “Institut franco-belge des frontières et discontinuités.” He is author of several books and journals, including Culture et Eurorégions. La coopération culturelle entre régions européennes. Éditions de l’Université de Bruxelles, 2013; [with Frédéric Durand], “Eurometropolis Lille-Kortrijk-Tournai: cross-border integration with or without the border?,” European Urban and Regional Studies, 25(3 ), 2018, 320–336; [with Bernié-Boissard C., Courouau J-F.], La région Occitanie Pyrénées-Méditerranée. Un portrait, Toulouse: Le Pérégrinateur, 2018; [with Seys F-O.], Régions en tension, régions en recomposition. Le Sud-Ouest européen en perspective, Sud-Ouest Européen, special issue n°48, 2019; [with Seys F-O.], La région, vous dîtes? Le kaléidoscope régional de l’Union européenne, Belgeo. Revue belge de géographie special issue, n°2-2019; “Cultural dimension of macro-regions. A prospective reflection,” in G. Abels, J. Battke (eds.), Regional governance in the EU. Regions and the future of Europe, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2019, 159–175.
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Abstract

Within the cross-disciplinary research on “Law, Changes and Technology,” this essay introduces the focus on “Islands and insularity: between law, geography, and fiction.” The intriguing and enthralling topic of “Island-ness” places emphasis on the manifold intersections between law, geographic studies, political power, and the humanities. These intersections reflect several issues, such as territorial localisation, environmental crises, colonial imaginaries, as well as the insular societal contexts in which they are imbricated. The focus delivers both a synthetic view of these questions and opens up further perspectives for reflection. The contributions engage various topics and adopt different approaches. Beyond this richness of inputs, the essays reveal some common characteristics of islands and insularity as objects and subjects of human imagination, social organisation, and scientific reflection. In particular, two main issues of islands and insularity can be identified, i.e. dialectics and metaphor.

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