Creativity and Construction Grammar: Cognitive and Psychological Issues

Thomas Hoffmann 1
  • 1 Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Chair of English Language and Linguistics, Universitätsallee 1, 85072 Eichstätt, Germany
Thomas Hoffmann
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  • Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Chair of English Language and Linguistics, Universitätsallee 1, 85072 Eichstätt, Germany
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Abstract

Creativity is an important evolutionary adaptation that allows humans to think original thoughts, to find solutions to problems that have never been encountered before and, potentially, to fundamentally change the way we live. In this special issue, we explore the cognitive and psychological factors that influence the verbal creativity of speakers.

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Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik (ZAA) is a peer-reviewed quarterly that reflects the entire spectrum of research on English and American language, literature and culture. Particular attention will be paid to the new literatures in English, the development of linguistic varieties outside of Britain and North America and the relationship between anglophone and neighbouring cultural areas.

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