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Glaz, Adam / Danaher, David / Lozowski, Przemyslaw

The Linguistic Worldview

Ethnolinguistics, Cognition, and Culture

DE GRUYTER OPEN

Open Access

    Open Access
    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    December 2013
    Copyright year:
    2013
    ISBN
    978-83-7656-074-8
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    Overview

    ethnolinguistics, Language and Culture, Cognitive Linguistics

    Aims and Scope

    the book is concerned with the linguistic worldview broadly understood, but it focuses on one particular variant of the idea, its sources, extensions, its critical assessment, and inspirations for related research. This approach is the ethnolinguistic linguistic worldview (LWV) program pursued in Lublin, Poland, and initiated and headed by Jerzy Bartminski. In its basic design, the volume emerged from the theme of the conference held in Lublin in October 2011: "The linguistic worldview or linguistic views of worlds?" If the latter is the case, then what worlds? Is it a case of one language/one worldview? Are there literary or poetic worldviews? Are there auctorial worldviews? Many of the chapters are based on presentations from that conference, and others have been written especially for the volume. Generally, there are four kinds of contributions: (i) a presentation and exemplification of the "Lublin style" LWV approach; (ii) studies inspired by this approach but not following it in detail; (iii) independent but related and compatible research; and (iv) a critical reappraisal of some specific ideas proposed by Jerzy Bartminski and his collaborators.

    Details

    492 pages
    DE GRUYTER OPEN
    Language:
    English
    Type of Publication:
    Monograph
    Keyword(s):
    the linguistic worldview, ethnolinguistics, language and culture, cognitive linguistics, Bartminski

    MARC record

    MARC record for eBook

    More ...

    The editors are specialists in English and Slavic linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and language-and-culture interface.

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