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Tomka, Miklós

Expanding Religion

Religious Revival in Post-Communist Central and Eastern Europe

Series:Religion and Society 47

    89,95 € / $126.00 / £82.00*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    January 2011
    Copyright year:
    2011
    ISBN
    978-3-11-022816-8
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    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Reiterated international comparative surveys offer evidences about developments of religion-related scene in Central and Eastern Europe. The present volume is the first one, which presents an extensive and detailed cross-national analysis of sociological data comparing extensively countries, regions and denominations in the past two decades.
    It displays achievements and shortages of a religious revival in the post-communist region, as well as religion’s role in family life, social responsibility and public commitment. It proves the combination of de-Christianization based on previous persecution of religion and an ongoing modernization and the rise and the transformation of religion. In some countries popular religiosity of traditional social strata is dominant. In other countries there is a visible transition from old and low strata religiosity to a more restricted but socially more influential religiosity of young middle and upper strata groups. In final outcome the volume substantiates the growing public role of religion in Eastern and Central Europe as well as the distinct impact of religiosity on individual behaviour. These results contradict the idea of an overwhelming secularization but argue for a more complex process overcoming the communist past.

    Supplementary Information

    Details

    23.0 x 15.5 cm
    viii, 258 pages
    Language:
    English
    Type of Publication:
    Collection
    Keyword(s):
    Secularization; Eastern Europe; Religious Revival; Social Change; Comparative Sociology

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    Miklós Tomka, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary.

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