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Shakespeare's Stationers

Studies in Cultural Bibliography

Ed. by Straznicky, Marta

Series:Material Texts

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PRESS

    69,95 € / $79.95 / £65.50*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    October 2012
    Copyright year:
    2013
    ISBN
    978-0-8122-0738-5
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Edited by Marta Straznicky, this seminal collection is the first to explore the multiple and intersecting forms of agency exercised by Shakespeare's stationers in the design, production, marketing, and distribution of his printed works.

    Details

    384 pages
    9 illus.
    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Keyword(s):
    Literature; Cultural Studies
    Readership:
    College/higher education;

    MARC record

    MARC record for eBook

    More ...

    Marta Straznicky is Professor of English at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. She is the author of Privacy, Playreading, and Women's Closet Drama, 1550-1700.

    Reviews

    "This is an original and substantial collection. The book is entirely timely."—Tiffany Stern, Oxford University"Offering a wealth of new evidence that stationers' decisions to print and publish Shakespeare were symptomatic of larger social, political, financial, and religious trends in the market and the world beyond the bookstall, Shakespeare's Stationers further solidifies the role of such agents in the development of Shakespeare as a playwright in print."—Sixteenth Century Journal"The goal of this collection is nothing short of a fundamental shift in Shakespearean textual criticism, and it achieves this goal with aplomb. The essays are original, substantial, and make a genuine contribution to the field."—Eric Rasmussen, University of Nevada"This book presents nine subtle and significant essays written by a notable group of book historians. The contributors examine the ways in which pre-1640 stationers defined and refashioned Shakespeare within the field of print. . . . the contributors are deeply immersed in the delectations of the archive, and their researches bear rich fruit."—Renaissance Quarterly

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