Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
The Making of Salafism understands the movement as a recent conception of Islam projected back onto the past, and it sees its purist evolution as a direct result of decolonization. Today, Salafis claim a monopoly on religious truth and freely confront other Muslims on theological and legal issues. Lauzière's pathbreaking history recognizes the social forces behind this purist turn, uncovering the popular origins of what has become a global phenomenon.

Lauzière, Henri

The Making of Salafism

Islamic Reform in the Twentieth Century

Series:Religion, Culture, and Public Life

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS

    47,95 € / $54.99 / £39.99*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    November 2015
    Copyright year:
    2015
    ISBN
    978-0-231-54017-9
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Some Islamic scholars hold that Salafism is an innovative and rationalist effort at Islamic reform that emerged in the late nineteenth century but gradually disappeared in the mid twentieth. Others argue Salafism is an anti-innovative and antirationalist movement of Islamic purism that dates back to the medieval period yet persists today. Though they contradict each other, both narratives are considered authoritative, making it hard for outsiders to grasp the history of the ideology and its core beliefs.

    Introducing a third, empirically based genealogy, The Making of Salafism understands the concept as a recent phenomenon projected back onto the past, and it sees its purist evolution as a direct result of decolonization. Henri Lauzière builds his history on the transnational networks of Taqi al-Din al-Hilali (1894–1987), a Moroccan Salafi who, with his associates, participated in the development of Salafism as both a term and a movement. Traveling from Rabat to Mecca, from Calcutta to Berlin, al-Hilali interacted with high-profile Salafi scholars and activists who eventually abandoned Islamic modernism in favor of a more purist approach to Islam. Today, Salafis tend to claim a monopoly on religious truth and freely confront other Muslims on theological and legal issues. Lauzière's pathbreaking history recognizes the social forces behind this purist turn, uncovering the popular origins of what has become a global phenomenon.

    Details

    328 pages
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Readership:
    Professional and scholarly;

    MARC record

    MARC record for eBook

    More ...

    Henri Lauzière is assistant professor of history at Northwestern University.

    Reviews

    Timely and important contribution.... excellently crafted. [The Making of Salafism] serves as an invaluable tool for a continuous interrogation of the concept of Salafism.

    A masterpiece of original scholarship and very highly recommended.

    While Lauzière's impressive exposition of the term's slippery semantic history is primarily of interest to specialists, his analysis is of crucial importance in demonstrating Salafism's commitment to textual literalism.

    An excellent book that provides a brilliant historical analysis of the emergence and trajectory of the concept of Salafism.... a major contribution to the field.

    [Lauzière] takes readers on a journey through the influences of political and social movements, their collaborators, and media pundits on a theological term—salafi.... Highly recommended.

    As a scholar of Islam, Lauzière remains unmatched.

    Ahmed El Shamsy, University of Chicago:
    This book fills a crucial gap in modern Islamic intellectual history: it untangles the now ubiquitous term Salafism, showing how the concept was invented, used, and contested through the twentieth century as both an analytical tool and a self-identifier. This conceptual history is paired with rich biographical material, which locates the shifting meanings of Salafism in the context of the wider historical processes of colonialism and independence.

    Jonathan Brown, Georgetown University:
    An essential resource for those trying to understand Salafis and Salafism, confusing terms with very contested histories. Henri Lauzière brings sense and order to a debate that reaches back to medieval times yet still flashes across screens today. The Making of Salafism illuminates a crucial aspect of the intellectual history of the Middle East and North Africa in the twentieth century.

    Malika Zeghal, Harvard University:
    This book brings much needed clarity to the history of Salafism and revises common accounts of a little known yet much talked about Islamic intellectual trend. Henri Lauzière has skillfully fleshed out the genealogy of Salafism, and his work will have an important impact on the field of the history of ideas in the modern Muslim world.

    Comments (0)

    Please log in or register to comment.
    Log in