Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details

The Sources of Husserl’s 'Ideas I'

Ed. by Staiti, Andrea / Clarke, Evan

    109,95 € / $126.99 / £100.00*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    May 2018
    Copyright year:
    2018
    ISBN
    978-3-11-055159-4
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Despite an ever-growing scholarly interest in the work of Edmund Husserl and in the history of the phenomenological movement, much of the contemporaneous scholarly context surrounding Husserl's work remains shrouded in darkness. While much has been written about the critiques of Husserl's work associated with Heidegger, Levinas, and Sartre, comparatively little is known of the debates that Husserl was directly involved in. The present volume addresses this gap in scholarship by presenting a comprehensive selection of contemporaneous responses to Husserl's work. Ranging in date from 1906 to 1917, these texts bookend Husserl's landmark Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (1913). The selection encompasses essays that Husserl responded to directly in the Ideas I, as well as a number of the critical and sympathetic essays that appeared in the wake of its publication. Significantly, the present volume also includes Husserl's subsequent responses to his critics. All of the texts included have been translated into English for the first time, introducing the reader to a wide range of long-neglected material that is highly relevant to contemporary debates regarding the meaning and possibility of phenomenology.

    Details

    viii, 476 pages
    Language:
    English
    Type of Publication:
    Source Edition
    Keyword(s):
    Ideas I; Husserl, Edmund
    Readership:
    Institutes, libraries, graduate students and faculty (Philosophy, esp. European; Intellectual History; German Studies.

    MARC record

    MARC record for eBook

    request permissions

    More ...

    Andrea Staiti and Evan Clarke, Boston College, Boston MA, USA.

    More by Staiti, Andrea:

    Comments (0)

    Please log in or register to comment.
    Log in