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Gaitsgory, Dennis / Lurie, Jacob

Weil's Conjecture for Function Fields

Volume I (AMS-199)

Series:Annals of Mathematics Studies 360

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS

    269,95 € / $309.50 / £239.00*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    2019
    Copyright year:
    2019
    To be published:
    February 2019
    ISBN
    978-0-691-18443-2
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    A central concern of number theory is the study of local-to-global principles, which describe the behavior of a global field K in terms of the behavior of various completions of K. This book looks at a specific example of a local-to-global principle: Weil’s conjecture on the Tamagawa number of a semisimple algebraic group G over K. In the case where K is the function field of an algebraic curve X, this conjecture counts the number of G-bundles on X (global information) in terms of the reduction of G at the points of X (local information). The goal of this book is to give a conceptual proof of Weil’s conjecture, based on the geometry of the moduli stack of G-bundles. Inspired by ideas from algebraic topology, it introduces a theory of factorization homology in the setting ℓ-adic sheaves. Using this theory, Dennis Gaitsgory and Jacob Lurie articulate a different local-to-global principle: a product formula that expresses the cohomology of the moduli stack of G-bundles (a global object) as a tensor product of local factors.

    Using a version of the Grothendieck-Lefschetz trace formula, Gaitsgory and Lurie show that this product formula implies Weil’s conjecture. The proof of the product formula will appear in a sequel volume.

    Details

    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Readership:
    Professional and scholarly;College/higher education;

    MARC record

    MARC record for eBook

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    Dennis Gaitsgory is professor of mathematics at Harvard University. He is the coauthor of A Study in Derived Algebraic Geometry. Jacob Lurie is professor of mathematics at Harvard University. He is the author of Higher Topos Theory (Princeton).

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