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Napoli, Philip

Social Media and the Public Interest

Media Regulation in the Disinformation Age

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS

    30,95 € / $34.99 / £27.50*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    2019
    Copyright year:
    2019
    To be published:
    August 2019
    ISBN
    978-0-231-54554-9
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Philip M. Napoli offers a timely and persuasive case for seeing social media as news media, with a fundamental obligation to serve the public interest. Media Technocracy offers valuable insights for the democratic governance of today’s most influential shapers of news.

    Details

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Readership:
    General/trade;

    More ...

    NapoliPhilip:

    Philip M. Napoli is professor and the James R. Shepley Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. His previous books include Audience Economics: Media Institutions and the Audience Marketplace (Columbia, 2003), and Audience Evolution: New Technologies and the Transformation of Media Audiences (Columbia, 2011). He is also the author of more than 90 articles in journals such as Communication Theory and Telecommunications Policy.Philip M. Napoli is the James R. Shepley Professor of Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, where he is also a faculty affiliate with the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy. His previous books include Audience Economics: Media Institutions and the Audience Marketplace (2003) and Audience Evolution: New Technologies and the Transformation of Media Audiences (2010), both from Columbia University Press.

    Reviews

    Seth C. Lewis, Papé Chair in Emerging Media, University of Oregon:
    While recent episodes have raised questions about algorithmic manipulation and discrimination, what remained missing was a truly comprehensive account, one that not only synthesizes the state of affairs but also offers a conceptual framework for interpreting these developments in light of public policy, news values and ethics, and the future of the public sphere. This book bridges that gap.

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