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Gandlevsky, Sergey

Illegible

A Novel

Transl. by Fusso, Susanne

Series:NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

CORNELL UNIVERSITY PRESS

    86,95 € / $99.95 / £79.00*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    2019
    Copyright year:
    2019
    To be published:
    November 2019
    ISBN
    978-1-5017-4767-0
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    Sergey Gandlevsky's 2002 novel Illegible has a double time focus, centering on the immediate experiences of Lev Krivorotov, a twenty-year-old poet living in Moscow in the 1970s, as well as his retrospective meditations thirty years later after most of his hopes have foundered. As the story begins, Lev is involved in a tortured affair with an older woman and consumed by envy of his more privileged friend and fellow beginner poet Nikita, one of the children of high Soviet functionaries who were known as "golden youth."

    In both narratives, Krivorotov recounts with regret and self-castigation the failure of a double infatuation, his erotic love for the young student Anya and his artistic love for the poet Viktor Chigrashov. When this double infatuation becomes a romantic triangle, the consequences are tragic.

    In Illegible, as in his poems, Gandlevsky gives us unparalleled access to the atmosphere of the city of Moscow and the ethos of the late Soviet and post-Soviet era, while at the same time demonstrating the universality of human emotion.

    Details

    228 pages
    CORNELL UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Keyword(s):
    contemporary Russian literature, Russian culture, Soviet dissident literature, samizdat, Russian poetry
    Readership:
    General/trade;

    More ...

    GandlevskySergey:

    Sergey Gandlevsky (b. 1952) is widely recognized as one of the most important living Russian poets and prose writers and has received numerous literary prizes.

    Reviews

    Sarah Pratt, University of Southern California, author of Nikolai Zabolotsky:

    "The quality of the translation is superb. The work captures Soviet and anti-Soviet language, themes, and the ambience of the time and the place, but it does not 'read like a translation.' The naturalness of the language is stunning."

    Alexandra Smith, University of Edinburgh:

    "The translation is excellent, the notes informative. Gandlevsky's novella provides insight into the everyday life of Russian/Soviet poets and writers who were part of the unofficial culture of the 1970s."

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