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Simpson, Andrew T.

The Medical Metropolis

Health Care and Economic Transformation in Pittsburgh and Houston

Series:American Business, Politics, and Society

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PRESS

    43,95 € / $49.95 / £38.50*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    2020
    Copyright year:
    2020
    To be published:
    October 2019
    ISBN
    978-0-8122-9651-8
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    The Medical Metropolis offers the first comparative, historical account of how big medicine shaped American cities in the postindustrial era. Taking Pittsburgh and Houston as case studies, Andrew T. Simpson traces the effects the changing business of American health care had on policy, privatization, and technological innovation.

    Details

    288 pages
    11 illus.
    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Keyword(s):
    History; Business; Public Policy; Urban Studies; Business; Economics; Political Science; Public Policy; Books of Regional Interest
    Readership:
    College/higher education;

    More ...

    Andrew T. Simpson teaches history at Duquesne University.

    Reviews

    "Well framed and full of insights for audiences in urban history, business history, health policy, and the history of medicine, this book interleaves the soaring visions and sobering realities of two American cities that sought to promote hopeful social and economic futures by investing in not-for profit health institutions. By situating the uncontrolled growth of U.S. healthcare expenditures alongside deliberate local and regional plans to realize civic improvement through healthcare revenues, Andrew T. Simpson firmly establishes the role of place, contingency, and governance in shaping the seemingly ungovernable system that threatens to bankrupt municipal economies at the same time that it promises to save them."—Jeremy Greene, author of Generic: The Unbranding of Modern Medicine

    "Access to health care remains near the center of American political discourse. Based on two local studies, Andrew T. Simpson deftly explains the economic imperatives of postwar urban sprawl in molding the shifting relationship between medical centers and the communities they serve."—Guenter B. Risse, author of Mending Bodies, Saving Souls: A History of Hospitals

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