Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details

Shue, Henry

Basic Rights

Subsistence, Affluence, and U.S. Foreign Policy: 40th Anniversary Edition

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS

    73,95 € / $84.50 / £70.00*

    eBook (PDF)
    Publication Date:
    1997
    Copyright year:
    1997
    To be published:
    April 2020
    ISBN
    978-0-691-20083-5
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    An expanded and updated edition of a classic work on human rights and global justiceSince its original publication, Basic Rights has proven increasingly influential to those working in political philosophy, human rights, global justice, and the ethics of international relations and foreign policy, particularly in debates regarding foreign policy’s role in alleviating global poverty. Henry Shue asks: Which human rights ought to be the first honored and the last sacrificed? Shue argues that subsistence rights, along with security rights and liberty rights, serve as the ground of all other human rights. This classic work, now available in a thoroughly updated fortieth-anniversary edition, includes a substantial new chapter by the author examining how the accelerating transformation of our climate progressively undermines the bases of subsistence like sufficient water, affordable food, and housing safe from forest-fires and sea-level rise. Climate change threatens basic rights.

    Details

    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Language:
    English
    Readership:
    General/trade;

    More ...

    Henry Shue is professor emeritus of politics and international relations at Merton College, University of Oxford. He is the author of Fighting Hurt: Rule and Exception in Torture and War and Climate Justice: Vulnerability and Protection.

    Reviews

    "Basic Rights presents an extremely powerful and influential argument for the claim that the right to subsistence is a basic human right."—Elizabeth Ashford, Journal of Social Philosophy"Shue has written the classical statement affirming that the rich nations are required by justice and by international law to share their abundance with those millions who are chronically malnourished."—Robert F. Drinan, Commonweal"This is one of the strongest arguments for an economic human right that I have found to date."—Carl Wellman, Human Rights Quarterly"A fine book with clear, incisive arguments on a crucial topic."—George Rainbolt, Ethics

    Comments (0)

    Please log in or register to comment.
    Log in